Educators

 


Teachers can play an important role in conflict prevention, but they don't always know how to do that, nor do they always do it willingly. In the clips below, Pamela Aall describes how the U.S. Institute of Peace has worked with teachers to make them more effective. Herb Kelman describes how other people must also play an education role--in his example, official leaders need to educate the public about possible peace agreements to gain their support.
 
Pamela Aall, of the U.S. Institute of Peace, describes a South Asian conference held by the Institute, in which the media and academic communities put pressure on the Indian government to be more sensitive to Muslims in that country.
Pamela Aall, of the U.S. Institute of Peace, observes that even educators in conflict zones seem to have (or at least teach) a very simplistic and biased view of the conflict they are involved in.
Pamela Aall describes how the U.S. Institute of Peace helps educators in conflict zones teach about conflict and peace.
Pamela Aall explains how peace education can be risky for teachers.
Herb Kelman explains that problem solving workshops can develop new approaches for transforming conflict, but cannot implement them. Track I leaders need to do that, and they need to educate the public to gain their support.
Carolyn Stephenson describes how teaching can be useful as a conflict resolution tool because it is so non-threatening.