Track One-Track Two Cooperation

 

William Zartman discusses several "gaps" between different approaches to conflict resolution.
Chester Crocker offers some insight as to how Track II actors might approach and work with Track I.
Carolyn Stephenson discusses the importance of parallel timelines for Track I and Track II.
Carolyn Stephenson describes a Track II effort that got stymied by Track I concerns.
Chester Crocker talks about how Tracks I and II commonly misunderstand each other.
Peter Coleman discusses the transformation of a track two process to a track one process.
Chester Crocker discusses the success of the peace process in Mozambique.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes the challenges he has faced in trying to better coordinate Track I and Track II diplomacy. In particular, he focuses on getting the US government to pay closer attention to Track II.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes the major obstacles for success in his work. He focuses on funding and building understanding on the part of Track I.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes his work in Bosnia.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes his work in Nepal.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes his work in Georgia.
John McDonald of the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy describes to trace the links between different tracks and develop a conceptual framework for achieving peace between the tracks.
Chester Crocker describes the critical role that insider partial intervenors sometimes play in Track I negotiations.
Ron Fisher describes Track I-II coordination in Tajikistan.
Ron Fisher describes the relationship between Track I and Track II players.
Ron Fisher describes the importance of pre-negotiation interventions in intractable conflict.
Herb Kelman explains that problem solving workshops can develop new approaches for transforming conflict, but cannot implement them. Track I leaders need to do that, and they need to educate the public to gain their support.
Herb Kelman reflects on how one "moves up" from the small-group process of problem solving workshops to having a larger societal or political impact.
Herb Kelman reflects on his role in what went right and wrong with the Oslo Accords.
Mohammed Abu-Nimer describes the misperceptions people have about peacebuilding. These misperceptions hamper its effectiveness, he feels. One misperception is about the different roles and relationships between Track I and Track II, and who is responsible for doing what.